English Grammar

Prepositional Phrases | Definitions, Examples and Uses

A prepositional phrase is a group of words that lacks either a verb or a subject, and that functions as a unified part of speech. It normally consists of a preposition and a noun or a preposition and a pronoun.  Most of the time, a prepositional phrase modifies a verb or a noun. These two kinds of prepositional phrases are called adverbial phrases and adjectival phrases, respectively. At the minimum, a prepositional phrase will begin with a preposition and end with a noun, pronoun, gerund, or clause, the "object" of the preposition

prepositional phrase is a group of words that lacks either a verb or a subject, and that functions as a unified part of speech. It normally consists of a preposition and a noun or a preposition and a pronoun.  Most of the time, a prepositional phrase modifies a verb or a noun. These two kinds of prepositional phrases are called adverbial phrases and adjectival phrases, respectively. At the minimum, a prepositional phrase will begin with a preposition and end with a noun, pronoun, gerund, or clause, the “object” of the preposition

1000 Prepositional Phrases

Out of struggle For want of With the view of At the moment At noon
Out of debt For the time being With the result that At the mercy of At night
Out of work For the sake of With the purpose of At the latest At most
Out of trouble For the rest of With the intention of At the height of At midnight
Out of the question For the moment With the help of At the hands of At midday
Out of the ordinary For the good of With the exception of At the foot of At loose ends
Out of the kitchen For the benefit (of) With the compliments of At the expense of At liberty
Out of stock For sure With the aid of At the end At length
Out of spite For short With respect to At the drop of a hat At least
Out of sight For sale With regret At the door At last
Out of school For safekeeping With regard to At the bottom of At large
Out of respect for For real With reference to At the beginning of At issue
Out of reach For once With attention At the age of At home
Out of print For nothing With approval At that At high speed
Out of practice For lunch With an eye to At times At heart
Out of place For luck With abandon At stake At hand
Out of pity For love With a will At short notice At full throttle
Out of order For life With a view to At sea At full tilt
Out of one’s mind For lack of At worst At school At full strength
Out of love For instance At work At risk At from the outset
Out of jealousy For hire At will At rest At for a fraction of
Out of in step For granted At war with At random At first sight
Out of ideas For good At war At present At first
Out of hatred For fun At university At play At fault
Out of hand For fear of At this point in time At places At face value
Out of fashion For example At this juncture At peace At ease
Out of duty For ever At the wheel At pains At breakfast
Out of doors For dinner At the thought of At one’s side At any rate
Out of date For certain At the top of At one’s request At any cost
Out of danger For breakfast At the time of At one’s leisure At an advantage
Out of curiosity For ages At the table At one’s disposal At all hours
Out of control For a while At the same time At one’s discretion At all events
Out of context For a walk At the risk of At one’s desk At all costs
Out of breath For a visit At the ready At one’s best At a time

A prepositional phrase is a group of words that lacks either a verb or a subject, and that functions as a unified part of speech. It normally consists of a preposition and a noun or a preposition and a pronoun.  Most of the time, a prepositional phrase modifies a verb or a noun. These two kinds of prepositional phrases are called adverbial phrases and adjectival phrases, respectively. At the minimum, a prepositional phrase will begin with a preposition and end with a noun, pronoun, gerund, or clause, the "object" of the prepositionA prepositional phrase is a group of words that lacks either a verb or a subject, and that functions as a unified part of speech. It normally consists of a preposition and a noun or a preposition and a pronoun.  Most of the time, a prepositional phrase modifies a verb or a noun. These two kinds of prepositional phrases are called adverbial phrases and adjectival phrases, respectively. At the minimum, a prepositional phrase will begin with a preposition and end with a noun, pronoun, gerund, or clause, the "object" of the preposition

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