English Grammar

Prepositional Phrases | Definitions, Examples and Uses

A prepositional phrase is a group of words that lacks either a verb or a subject, and that functions as a unified part of speech. It normally consists of a preposition and a noun or a preposition and a pronoun.  Most of the time, a prepositional phrase modifies a verb or a noun. These two kinds of prepositional phrases are called adverbial phrases and adjectival phrases, respectively. At the minimum, a prepositional phrase will begin with a preposition and end with a noun, pronoun, gerund, or clause, the "object" of the preposition

prepositional phrase is a group of words that lacks either a verb or a subject, and that functions as a unified part of speech. It normally consists of a preposition and a noun or a preposition and a pronoun.  Most of the time, a prepositional phrase modifies a verb or a noun. These two kinds of prepositional phrases are called adverbial phrases and adjectival phrases, respectively. At the minimum, a prepositional phrase will begin with a preposition and end with a noun, pronoun, gerund, or clause, the “object” of the preposition

1000 Prepositional Phrases

Out of struggleFor want ofWith the view ofAt the momentAt noon
Out of debtFor the time beingWith the result thatAt the mercy ofAt night
Out of workFor the sake ofWith the purpose ofAt the latestAt most
Out of troubleFor the rest ofWith the intention ofAt the height ofAt midnight
Out of the questionFor the momentWith the help ofAt the hands ofAt midday
Out of the ordinaryFor the good ofWith the exception ofAt the foot ofAt loose ends
Out of the kitchenFor the benefit (of)With the compliments ofAt the expense ofAt liberty
Out of stockFor sureWith the aid ofAt the endAt length
Out of spiteFor shortWith respect toAt the drop of a hatAt least
Out of sightFor saleWith regretAt the doorAt last
Out of schoolFor safekeepingWith regard toAt the bottom ofAt large
Out of respect forFor realWith reference toAt the beginning ofAt issue
Out of reachFor onceWith attentionAt the age ofAt home
Out of printFor nothingWith approvalAt thatAt high speed
Out of practiceFor lunchWith an eye toAt timesAt heart
Out of placeFor luckWith abandonAt stakeAt hand
Out of pityFor loveWith a willAt short noticeAt full throttle
Out of orderFor lifeWith a view toAt seaAt full tilt
Out of one’s mindFor lack ofAt worstAt schoolAt full strength
Out of loveFor instanceAt workAt riskAt from the outset
Out of jealousyFor hireAt willAt restAt for a fraction of
Out of in stepFor grantedAt war withAt randomAt first sight
Out of ideasFor goodAt warAt presentAt first
Out of hatredFor funAt universityAt playAt fault
Out of handFor fear ofAt this point in timeAt placesAt face value
Out of fashionFor exampleAt this junctureAt peaceAt ease
Out of dutyFor everAt the wheelAt painsAt breakfast
Out of doorsFor dinnerAt the thought ofAt one’s sideAt any rate
Out of dateFor certainAt the top ofAt one’s requestAt any cost
Out of dangerFor breakfastAt the time ofAt one’s leisureAt an advantage
Out of curiosityFor agesAt the tableAt one’s disposalAt all hours
Out of controlFor a whileAt the same timeAt one’s discretionAt all events
Out of contextFor a walkAt the risk ofAt one’s deskAt all costs
Out of breathFor a visitAt the readyAt one’s bestAt a time

A prepositional phrase is a group of words that lacks either a verb or a subject, and that functions as a unified part of speech. It normally consists of a preposition and a noun or a preposition and a pronoun.  Most of the time, a prepositional phrase modifies a verb or a noun. These two kinds of prepositional phrases are called adverbial phrases and adjectival phrases, respectively. At the minimum, a prepositional phrase will begin with a preposition and end with a noun, pronoun, gerund, or clause, the "object" of the preposition A prepositional phrase is a group of words that lacks either a verb or a subject, and that functions as a unified part of speech. It normally consists of a preposition and a noun or a preposition and a pronoun.  Most of the time, a prepositional phrase modifies a verb or a noun. These two kinds of prepositional phrases are called adverbial phrases and adjectival phrases, respectively. At the minimum, a prepositional phrase will begin with a preposition and end with a noun, pronoun, gerund, or clause, the "object" of the preposition

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